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Chairs from the Collection
Criaterra | Adital Ela

2009, Prototype | Materials: Soil, straw, compost, 35X35X35 cm
Donated by the designer

This stool is part of a series entitled "Terra," which includes products and furniture made from earth and natural fibers as an expression of the link between design and sustainability. The objects are 100% organic, and can be produced anywhere from local soil and crop residue. The process requires zero energy, creates no pollution, and is fully renewable and compostable.
The objects in the series have been produced by using a unique technique of compression that combines historical and ethnic attributes with contemporary methods of production. After the stool has served its purpose, a new object may be produced or the stool can be disassembled and returned to the earth from which it was produced.

Adital Ela (b. 1974 in Israel) holds a bachelor's degree in Industrial Design from the Holon Institute of Technology (HIT), and a master's degree in Design from the Design Academy Eindhoven in Holland. She specializes in sustainable design and, over the years, has received much of her inspiration from her travels to third-world countries, such as India, where she has been exposed to various earth-based habitats. Today, Ella heads the S-Sense Design Studio in Israel and lectures in "Social-Environmental Design" in HIT's study program leading to a master's degree in design. She lectures at international conferences and leads seminars in sustainable design. In the 23rd Biennale of Design in Ljubljana, she was awarded a "Badge of Honor" for her Terra series.


Photo: Itay Benit

 

 
 
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