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Exhibitions > Past
Desirable Object
Bedouin Women Create Contemporary Folk Art
July 25 -   October 24, 2016
Exhibition

The Exhibition has been closed

The exhibition reveals a variety of works created by Bedouin women over the past two decades to decorate their homes or for social events in their community, and which reflect the social and cultural change process taking place in Bedouin society in the Negev with the transition to permanent dwellings.

Most of the items are based on reusing household objects and discarded objects, such as fan covers, plastic containers, clothes hangers, irrigation pipes, and tin cans. Most of them serve as a basis which is then completely covered with threads, weaving, embroidery, and sewing decorations, and more recently secular and religious texts are also incorporated into them. Use of elements from the traditions of the past is clearly evident in the pieces, and we can see the threads of the past interwoven into the new objects that reflect Bedouin life in the present.

Curators

Curator: Orna Goren
Consultant: Dalia Barki

Designers
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Photo: Shay Ben-Efraim
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