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25.02.13 - Lesson 2 - Starting to Understand the Basics

Design Lab | Oded Ezer | Graphic Design & Typography
Oded in a discussion with the students

The lesson begins with a discussion with the Museum staff, headed by the Museum's curator, Galit Gaon. Galit emphasizes that Design Museum Holon provides a platform for visitors to ask questions, and that it is in the Lab that people can anchor their thinking. Visitors see finished products in the exhibitions in the Museum spaces, whereas in the Lab they are exposed to the process, to the ‘behind the scenes'.

Skeleton + Style = Letter

In our first Lab session we started talking about the components of the letters. In order to understand the basics of Hebrew script it is necessary to understand two aspects: What is a skeleton, and what is style. We can liken this to the DNA of the script.

Finding the skeletons and placing them next to skeletons of the same letter in a different font enables us to see the different basic structures from which the letter is composed.

Preparing a style palette enables detection of the style characteristics that join the skeleton and together create the letter. The different serif forms are evident, as well as special details in the font.

The searches and inquiries are based on conclusions drawn by Oded from Ada Yardeni's book The Book of Hebrew Script: History, Palaeography, Script Styles, Calligraphy & Design.

Design Lab | Oded Ezer | Graphic Design & Typography
Going over the students' assignments

Letters Have Skeletons Too

Each student was given a few fonts, which he had to investigate by means of a process of extracting skeletons, preparing a style palette, and classification. The exercise makes it possible to identify and isolate the nature of the letter in each font type. Finding the skeleton is based on following the thinnest line in the center of the letter. In this exercise the serifs don't have any particular significance for the skeleton.

During the process of extracting skeletons it is important to make a note of insights and conclusions about the structure of the letters specific to the font.

Design Lab | Oded Ezer | Graphic Design & Typography
Script has DNA too (from Ada Yardeni's The Book of Hebrew Script: History, Palaeography, Script Styles, Calligraphy & Design)

Design Lab | Oded Ezer | Graphic Design & Typography
The skeletons follow the same rules

Design Lab | Oded Ezer | Graphic Design & Typography
It is important to make a note of insights about the structure of the letters

Design Lab | Oded Ezer | Graphic Design & Typography
Comparison between the skeletons of different fonts

One of the conclusions was that the skeletons of different fonts are not identical, but that they do follow the same rules.

Style - ‘Dressing' the Skeleton

The aim of the exercise was to identify the style characteristics of the Hebrew letter. After identifying the characteristics of each letter, the characteristics were arranged in the form of an ‘inventory'.

"The style palette is important, along with the letter's skeleton, otherwise there will be no difference between the fonts", says Oded.

Design Lab | Oded Ezer | Graphic Design & Typography

Design Lab | Oded Ezer | Graphic Design & Typography

Design Lab | Oded Ezer | Graphic Design & Typography
Three examples of style palettes for the Drogolin font

Design Lab | Oded Ezer | Graphic Design & Typography

Design Lab | Oded Ezer | Graphic Design & Typography

For the Next Lesson - Musical Modulations

Continuing their initial inquiries, each student will work with a different font to the one he researched, and modulate it. The question is, "How can new skeletons be created based on what we've learned?"

If we liken it to music, the students thus far researched the basic scale, and will now transfer their fonts to a different scale. In other words, they have to find rules that will change the font's basic skeleton and create a new one that doesn't exist in other fonts. These rules will be applied to each letter, while maintaining the identity of the Hebrew letter.

Photographs by Maayan Armon and Michal Shani
Written by Michal Shani

Introduction / Post 1 / Post 2 / Post 3

 
 
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