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Exhibitions > 1898

 

Lady's Columbia Chainless Bicycle

The chainless bicycle was developed and designed for female riders. The removal of the chain enabled them to ride more easily, and ensured that their dresses would not get dirty or caught in the chain. At the same time, the maintenance of the chainless bicycle was more complicated than that of a regular bike. It was also more expensive than regular bicycles, costing $125 at a time when a regular bicycle cost between $35 and $75.

The chainless bicycle was widely marketed and was quite popular in 1888-1889. Initially, it was a novelty whose success was mainly due to the cumbersomeness of bike chains and the noise they produced. Around 1900, however, the design of chains and sprockets was significantly improved. The advantage of a chainless bike decreased, and its high price was an obvious default.

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